Weekly Online Interview Magazine
close
Sarah Brightman: I would have preferred to be called a hybrid rather than a classical cros...
All - Music + Sounds

Sarah Brightman: I would have preferred to be called a hybrid rather than a classical crossover artist

The world’s biggest selling soprano, Sarah Brightman, on her space-theme latest album “Dream chaser”, her passion for space, and “Phantom of the Opera” years.

How did you manage to create a soundscape that came purely from being inspired by space?

– I worked with a wonderful producer named Mike Hedges, who had help engineer and produced some of the sounds for U2, The Cure and also has a love for classical music and choirs and I felt he would be the right person to work with. We did a lot of experimenting and I worked really through instinct and what made me feel very spacey when listening to certain sounds. And we just collected all of these pieces and sounds together to create the soundscape we did.

Space travel is your obsession, your childhood dream. What did you take so long to record a space-themed album?

– All of my albums subliminally in the tracks have had space sounds behind them and recorded them. I think I have always been ready to do a space album but it was just the timing that helped me created it at this particular time. I am interested in space. I have been interested in it since I was a young girl in the 60’s watching the first man land on the moon.

What’s the very first thing about space from your childhood?

– Being a young girl in the 60’s watching the first man land on the moon.

Is the space travel on your ‘bucket list’?

-Space travel is definitely on my bucket list.

What else?

 – I would like to produce and direct a movie, not necessarily a vastly commercial one, but something that gives me a lot of pleasure to put together.

 

You helped to bring classical music and opera, to wider, mainstream audiences. However, you’ve mentioned that you can’t stand being called ‘A Classical Crossover’ anymore. Why?

– I don’t think that anyone really opens the door in these situations because everything really has been done before in some form or another. I have had a long career in music and very organically working in the different styles that I have, a sort of fusion happened later on in my life, in music, which created I suppose what people sort of classify as a sort of a singer classical crossover –yes lots of singers after myself, Pavarotti and Bocelli – you know we were working in this kind of form without even realizing it and many singers after that embraced it and it has really created a new genre. I would have preferred to be called a hybrid rather than a classical crossover artist.

Phantom of the Opera celebrated 25 years on Broadway a while ago. What does it mean to you to be one of the most successful musicals ever?

 –  I feel extremely proud about this. It´s lovely because apparently everybody said that I’ve inspired the composer to do it. I was very young at the time. The fun of it is watching everybody else come up and do all the parts – the younger generation coming up and singing it and bringing something different to it. And you think “That´s amazing”. I actually initiated that and now all those people, all these years later enjoying all those parts and getting something out of it. And all the audiences are still enjoying it. It´s a good feeling, cause as creators and artists, we always want something to be enjoyed, that’s our job to entertain people.

Do you miss Broadway?

 – I don’t miss Broadway. I was only on Broadway a couple of times one with ‘Phantom of the Opera’ and then ‘Aspects of Love’ and in London, I did 3 musicals, Phantom of the Opera, Cats, and Pirates of Pansies. I never expected to be in musicals. It sorts of just happened after a challenging recording career in my early 20’s, so I decided to go into theatre really to keep myself in entertainment and work and all those things that one goes through in an early career. But it has been wonderful what I have been involved with and I do fully appreciate it. And who knows maybe one day I do will do something on Broadway. I do like to do plays though, so I am hoping that one day I can do some more plays.

What have you learned from ‘the Phantom of Opera’?  

– I think really through Phantom of the Opera I learned about global success, and how to deal with it, all the pit falls that happen and how to live through that and make the most of it. Keep people enjoying in the future what you have gained from that and what you have done through the music.

You’re cracked the Billboard 200 several times—even surpassing Elton John and The Rolling Stones as most popular British act in America. How do you deal with all that ‘the most…’ titles?

– I love the titles. I mean I think everyone appreciates when they’re being successful in their work, especially if they have a passion for what they do, and I really have a passion for what I do. It doesn’t mean everything though to me, I am not one of those people who suddenly says I have to have a Grammy or I have got to do this in my life. It is really about doing wonderful work and enjoying it and getting it out there and hoping everyone would appreciate it as much as you have.

 

I think really through Phantom of the Opera I learned about global success, and how to deal with it, all the pit falls that happen and how to live through that and make the most of it. Keep people enjoying in the future what you have gained from that and what you have done through the music.

 

When and where were you happiest? 

– I have to say my childhood was my happiest time in London. I was very lucky with my childhood. I was born into a very loving family, with gorgeous parents, who supported me with whatever I wanted to do. I think it is fine to say your happiest times are your childhood because it is the days of innocence, it is the days of rest, the days of learning, you are young and powerful. Everything is fresh… so yes that was definitely my happiest time.

What makes you laugh most?

– I have two miniature dachshunds and they make me laugh the most. [Revised, and re-edited from an interview by Ali Tufan Koc]


COMMENTS ARE OFF THIS POST

INSTAGRAM FEED

Follow on Instagram